Charulata

1964

Drama / Romance

117
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 93%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 91%
IMDb Rating 8.2 10 5

Synopsis


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November 1, 2021

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1.05 GB
1280*720
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
117 min
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1.97 GB
1920×1080
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
117 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by MartinHafer 8 / 10 / 10

Very good mostly because of its realism and simplicity.

Recently, I received some very nice emails from someone who appreciated my reviews (there's at least one!) and they recommended I look into the films of Satyajit Ray--particularly "The Big City" and "The Lonely Wife". I am happy I listened, as I really liked both films--particularly "The Big City". The best thing about these films is their ordinariness--how they are about everyday folks and the films are not glamorized or Hollywoodized in the least. The unfortunate thing, however, is that both are pretty lousy prints with relatively poor captions--and both appear to be directly copied from a videotape. Now what I saw in the film and what the summary says are not exactly the same. Perhaps this is due to a mistranslation, or perhaps when the husband says 'brother' it's a diminutive term and the person he's saying it to is actually his cousin, but I sure was under the impression that Amal was Bhapati's brother. Charlu is a lonely lady back in India in 1879. Her husband is the publisher of a newspaper--so she lives in relative luxury but doesn't see enough of him, as he's very busy. So, Bhapati gets the idea to have his family come and live with them. The brother-in-law seems like a good choice to move in with them, as he says he wants to work on the paper and contribute. Amal, however, is a recent college graduate and is not at all interested in doing any work--just write. Quickly Amal and Charlu become friends, as both of them have a common interest--writing. However, this familiarity combined with Bhapati's absence spell disaster--as does trusting the brother-in-law with the paper's finances. There's more to the story than this, but it's best you see it yourself and see it unfold. The acting, writing and direction are very nice--mostly because it seems awfully real. And, if you like Neo-realist films or stories by Majid Majidi, then you should really like "The Lonely Wife". Not great but very, very good.

Reviewed by Hitchcoc 7 / 10 / 10

Subdued to Perfection

This is the story of a woman, held back by a boorish husband. It is India during British imperialism. She strives to please him. He is full of himself. He produces a vacuous newspaper whose political views aren't even caustic enough to bother the British. Before long a young man shows up. He is gentle and sees the worth of Charulata and encourages her writing which is superior to her husbands. Of course, she falls in love with him and is torn between her obligation to a weak marriage and her emotions.

Reviewed by gavin6942 7 / 10 / 10

Far From the Worst Indian Film I Have Seen

The lonely wife (Madhabi Mukherjee) of a newspaper editor (Sailen Mukherjee) falls in love with her visiting cousin-in-law (Soumitra Chatterjee), who shares her love for crafting literature. I make no secret of the fact that I simply do not care for Indian films. I can't really express why, but they do not appeal to me. With regard to Ray, I was not moved by the Apu trilogy. However, after seeing "The Music Room" (1958) I found there was at least one Indian film I liked. And now "Charulata". Much has been written about how this film has more of a Western sense to it, even invoking the name of Mozart. That may be so. But I also appreciate that at this point Ray had access to better equipment, apparently. Cinematography-wise, this is his best-looking film, and he experiments a little bit in a dreamlike way that I find very effective. We have the right balance -- not that low grade film India had in the past, and not the overly polished junk of Bollywood. This and "Music Room" may be the pinnacle of Indian film.

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