Sherlock Holmes' Fatal Hour

1931

Crime / Mystery

149
IMDb Rating 5.9 10 372

Synopsis


Downloaded times
December 30, 2021

Cast

720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
746.83 MB
1280*720
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
84 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1.35 GB
1920×1080
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
84 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by MartinHafer 8 / 10 / 10

Wow...a nice surprise here!

In the 1930s, Arthur Wontner made several well-made Sherlock Holmes stories. Unlike the others I have seen, however, THE SLEEPING CARDINAL is not based on a Conan Doyle tale but was created for this film. In addition, this movie makes quite a few references to contemporary things—things you would not have heard about in the original stories (such as cars and the German Reichstag). The story begins with a young well-to-do man doing extremely well at Bridge. In fact, in recent months, he's been unbeatable. In light of this AND that the man had been on the brink of bankruptcy before this leads many to think he must be cheating…but how? When the means of cheating IS discovered by the evil Moriarty, he wants to use this man's position at the Foreign Office to do some "bad things"—and he will blackmail the card cheat into doing his bidding. The man's nice sister, incidentally, has contacted Holmes with her concerns—though she is not yet aware of the blackmail attempt. When this man is later found dead, Holmes announces that he was murdered—though the evidence seems to clearly indicate that he killed himself. While I am a Sherlock Holmes purist and this is NOT an original tale, I appreciated this film quite a bit. Sure, Inspector Lestrade was only a minor character in a small number of Holmes stories and Moriarty was actually killed at Whisteria Falls in the Conan Doyle stories, but the spirit of the stories is intact here—much more so than in most of the Basil Rathbone versions of Sherlock Holmes. The way he deduces, the character of Watson and the entire style of the film fits very nicely into the Holmes cannon. Worth seeing and a very interesting tale—showing Wontner was quite capable in this role. By the way, the Ian Fleming in this film who played Watson is NOT the same man who wrote the James Bond stories—though they share the same name.

Reviewed by TheLittleSongbird 5 / 10 / 10

The fatal hour comes on apace

Am a huge fan of Sherlock Holmes and get a lot of enjoyment out of Arthur Conan Doyle's stories. Also love Basil Rathbone's and especially Jeremy Brett's interpretations to death. So would naturally see any Sherlock Holmes adaptation that comes my way, regardless of its reception. Furthermore, interest in seeing early films based on Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories and wanting to see as many adaptations of any Sherlock Holmes stories as possible sparked my interest in seeing 'The Sleeping Cardinal', part of (and the first?) of the series of film with Arthur Wontner. Would also see anything that has Holmes encountering his arch-nemesis Professor Moriaty. 'The Sleeping Cardinal' turned out to be very much worthwhile. Not one of the best Sherlock Holmes adaptations certainly, the best of the Jeremy Brett adaptations and films of Basil Rathone fit under this category. It's also not among the worst, being much better than any of the Matt Frewer films (particularly 'The Sign of Four') and the abominable Peter Cook 'The Hound of the Baskervilles'. It's not perfect. The sound quality is less great, while some of the pace could have been tighter and some of the dialogue unnecessarily rambles a bit. However, there are some starkly beautiful images on display and the period detail is handsome and evocative. The writing generally is thought-provoking, Holmes' deductions and crime solving are a huge part of the fun, the mystery and suspense is generally intact (the chemistry between Holmes and Moriaty thankfully do not underwhelm) and the story is intriguing and not hard to follow. Arthur Wontner may technically have been too old for Holmes but he did not look too old and his portrayal is on the money, handling the personality and mannerisms of the character spot on without over-doing or under-playing. Ian Fleming is a charming, loyal, intelligent and amusing Watson, with nice chemistry between him and Wontner, really liked his failed attempts at deduction. Lestrade is not too much of an idiot thankfully. The support is solid, though only Norman McKinnell's creepy Moriaty and refreshingly sassy Minnie Raynor are truly memorable. Overall, worthwhile. 7/10 Bethany Cox

Reviewed by bkoganbing 5 / 10 / 10

Richelieu speaks

Although Arthur Wontner and Ian Fleming make a fine pair of leads as Sherlock Holmes and Dr. John Watson in The Cardinal Speaks the film itself is kind of slow going in comparison to the classic Basil Rathbone-Nigel Bruce series from the USA. In addition a lot of this film seems to have been lost including a pair of attempts on the life of Holmes that are mentioned in passing. The Adairs, brother and sister heiresses are in a bit of a jackpot. The inheritance is gone and the brother has resorted to some card cheating to keep up the cash flow as his job in the foreign office is not enough income. His sister comes to Dr. Watson an old friend of their father and with that comes Sherlock Holmes. It turns out the young heir is being drawn into a counterfeiting scheme involving Bank of England notes, a scheme from the fertile brain of the arch enemy of Sherlock Holmes, Professor Moriarty. He gets his instructions from a painting of Cardinal Richelieu in a museum which talks to him, hence the original title. The Cardinal Speaks moves along quite sluggishly and I think there's too much out of the original film to make it quite coherent. You have to fill too many spots. As one who liked the Basil Rathbone Holmes films for the most part I was used to kindly, motherly Mary Gordon as housekeeper Mrs. Hudson. Seeing cockney Minnie Rayner was certainly different and maybe more of what Arthur Conan Doyle had in mind. Holmes fans will like this, but a bit slow for the rest of us. This was the first time Arthur Wontner played Holmes and his other three films were better.

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