Something the Lord Made

Drama / TV Movie

199
IMDb Rating 8.2 10 12

Synopsis


Downloaded times
December 13, 2020

Director

Cast

Alan Rickman as Phil Allen
Kyra Sedgwick as Elizabeth Cole
Merritt Wever as Mrs. Saxon
720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
1014.1 MB
1280*720
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
110 min
P/S N/A / N/A
2.03 GB
1920×1080
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
110 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by spankymac 9 / 10 / 10

I wasn't expecting a story this powerful.

It's gratifying to know that I'm not the only one who was surprisingly moved by this story. I had known only a tiny part of the story before the movie: that a white surgeon and a black technician developed the process that could save "blue babies." That's a huge accomplishment, but only a portion of the story. Alan Rickman does a splendid job portraying Dr. Blalock. There are a few moments when his southern accent slips and a little British comes through, but in terms of portrayal of the character, he is convincing. Blalock is ambitious, and in fact so focused on his professional and medical goals that sometimes he's clueless as to what others are going through to get him what he wants. He's also at turns arrogant and compassionate...exactly what one would have to be to do what he did. One thing the movie communicates very effectively is just how much of a revolution this surgery was: not merely operating on a baby heart, Dr. Blalock opened the gate to surgery on *any* human heart. Rickman doesn't overdo it, but he gets the character across. Mos Def steals the show, however, in his subtle portrayal of Vivien Thomas. There's no grandstanding in this performance; he makes us believe that we know Thomas, and that to know him is to love him. He plays a man who had more character in his little finger than most people find in their whole lives, and he does it with zero ham. It isn't just that he gives an understated performance...he becomes this man who feels deeply even though he doesn't express it loudly. You see it in his eyes, in his pauses, in his voice. It's hard to describe, except to say that beneath the calm, quiet, even deferential exterior there is, undeniably, a whole person, a fully human, noble, wise, mature, gracious character. A previous commentator asks if the presentation, near the end of the story, of an honorary degree was supposed to be an apotheosis of sorts. Perhaps. I suspect, however, that it isn't the conferring of a degree but the unveiling of the portrait, that actually vindicates Thomas and lifts him to his place in the medical pantheon of Johns-Hopkins' larger-than-life wonder-workers. At the end of the film, Vivien is sitting in the lobby, looking at his own portrait next to that of Blalock's when he's paged as "Dr. Thomas." He has to wipe the tears from his eyes to respond to the page. Maybe it's the degree and the portrait together. The same commentator asked whether the film omitted mention of Thomas's eventual title. Actually, there's a scene immediately after their arrival in Baltimore in which the Director of Laboratories gives Vivien some money and tells him to bring coffee and a donut. At the end of the film, when Blalock calls Vivien's office, we see Vivien's title on the office door: Director of Laboratories. The irony is sweet. This is a compelling, touching film, with wonderful performances all around.

Reviewed by rwerblin 10 / 10 / 10

You must experience this movie

I'm a physician who has been involved with children with congenital heart disease, including "blue babies." This movie will move you, regardless of who you are. Drs. Blalock & Taussig, whose ingenious procedure is used to convey the aspects of this film (Blalock-Taussig Shunt), were two of my 'heros.' The amazing genius and operative dexterity of surgical research phenomenon Vivian Thomas, and his focus on, love for, and persistence with his work against seemingly unscale-able obstacles, in superbly portrayed by Mos Def. His achievements, out of his background and lack of opportunities, made me feel that I should have been able to do much more than I have, given how much more was just handed to me. We should all feel we can accomplish greatly, and without resorting to destructive acts or words, when seeing the manner with which this class-act man performed. The depiction of the incredible bravery of Blalock, Taussig, and Thomas, who were embarking on not just uncharted, but forbidden surgical waters, warned that if such an "adventure" went awry, they'd be "on their own", made me feel timid and lacking in fortitude, by comparison. SEE (actually FEEL) THIS MOVIE!!

Reviewed by Melrosemiss 10 / 10 / 10

medical miracle surpasses racial climate of the times

I have seen this movie at least 8 times since it first appeared last summer and never tire of it. I must add that my entire adult working life has been in the field of medicine so maybe I have more interest than some. The names of the residents in this film are names I have heard throughout my career. I am amazed by the genius of Vivien Thomas (or anyone without medical training who could understand as he did) and at the fact that Doctor Blalock accepted him as an individual (most of the time), without regard to his race or lack of medical education. I cannot think of actors who would have done a better job than Alan Rickman or Mos Def and I applaud them, and the rest of the cast, as well as the producers, for bringing this wonderful story to life. I can only hope it will be available on DVD soon, if not yet. I have told at least 100 people about this movie, without giving away too much detail. If you are interested in medicine, and the development of new procedures that change lives, especially of the very, very young, then this is a movie for you. Even if you do not have a medical background, it is worth seeing for the genius and compassion of those two men who did not allow the racial climate of the times to overpower their desire to make a difference. To all the residents who learned at Hopkins from these two gifted men, be forever grateful that their lives touched yours, albeit briefly. We lost two very gifted men who did an exceptional job of training others to follow in their footsteps. Jeers to the staff members who were ruled by race and education and a firm salute to those who were not. I give it a 10!

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