The Weirdo

1989

Drama / Horror

85
IMDb Rating 4.6 10 171

Synopsis


Downloaded times
October 11, 2021

Director

Cast

720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
835.88 MB
1280*720
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
91 min
P/S N/A / N/A
1.52 GB
1920×1080
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
91 min
P/S N/A / N/A

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by BA_Harrison 6 / 10 / 10

Wonders will never cease: an Andy Milligan film that I didn't hate.

Andy Milligan films are not for everyone; I'm not even sure if they're for me, and I've already seen quite a few. That said, The Weirdo appears to be one of the directors more accessible efforts, with an air of professionalism not evident in the others I have seen. Now don't get me wrong - this is still rough and ready, low-budget fare - but the story flows nicely and the characters are well developed, Mr. Milligan clearly making an effort to emotionally engage his audience. Heading the cast is Steve Burington as autistic young man Donnie Raymond, who lives in a shed belonging to well-meaning Miss Martins (Naomi Sherwood), for whom he runs errands. Subject to regular bullying by three local thugs - Nails (Shawn Player), Vic (Dennis Robbins) and Dean (Patrick Thomas) - Donnie leads a relatively lonely existence until he is befriended by fellow outcast, pretty disabled 18-year-old Jenny (Jessica Straus). The young couple's friendship blossoms into love, and so Donnie is rightfully upset when his uncaring mother (Lynne Caryl), who lives on the other side of town, tries to send him to Mississippi, having agreed to sell him to sleazoid Cycil Price (Carroll Oden). Donnie finally snaps, decapitating his mother with a meat cleaver, and kills Price with a pole; he also takes care of pervy priest Reverand Cummings (John Rand), and his meddling wife (Janet Roberts), who also stand in the way of his relationship with Jenny. Ultimately, Donnie turns his rage towards the trio of bullies who have made his life a misery, before - in true classic horror film fashion - he is attacked by an angry mob. Although The Weirdo still suffers from amateurish acting and extreme budgetary restraints (the gore effects are especially cheap), for once Milligan seems to really care about his characters, telling a surprisingly moving tale of doomed love and inevitable tragedy (albeit one with an admittedly silly and violent final act). While I'm not suggesting that this film will make a dedicated Milligan fan out of anyone, those with a tolerance for z-grade trash will probably find something to like about The Weirdo, even if it's only the fact that it's far more entertaining than The Rats Are Coming! The Werewolves Are Here! (which I consider to be completely worthless).

Reviewed by JohnSeal 6 / 10 / 10

Not without its virtues

The Weirdo (actually entitled Weirdo, the Beginning on the video print) was a massive step up for director Andy Milligan after the train wreck that was Carnage (1986). Another in his series of 'dinner theater' productions, it was shot in Southern California with an amateur cast. And while I would never, EVER claim that it's a classic film of any variety, it weaves a strange spell thanks to Milligan's preference for deadpan dialogue, angular set-ups, and odd settings. Indeed, with the exception of only a few 'big city' shots, The Weirdo resides in a rural fairytale version of the Southland located not a million miles from the Spahn Movie Ranch. If Ingmar Bergman ever made a no-budget horror film, it might look like this, especially during its expository first hour, where characters argue, snipe, and moan endlessly at each other. With oddly affecting performances by cute little Jessica Straus and dear old Naomi Sherwood, as well as a generous assortment of gruesome deaths in the final third of the film, this is a unique example of truly independent filmmaking.

Reviewed by kirbylee70-599-526179 6 / 10 / 10

MILLIGAN MORALITY TALE

Garagehouse Pictures is releasing two Andy Milligan films on blu-ray for the first time. One is MONSTROSITY. This is the other. Of the two this one is the better film but likely to not find as big a base. It's a bit more well done and with any film of Andy Milligan saying that is something. Donny is a mentally challenged young man, that way for many reasons most being his upbringing by an alcoholic mother. Basically raised by the kindly Miss Martins, Donny lives in a shed behind her house. Picked on by the local troublemakers and prone to wandering the streets Donny has hit an age where he's beginning to notice the opposite sex. First he notices Miss Martin's niece when she comes to stay and then while walking the nearby parks he meets Jenny. Jenny is a handicapped girl with a bad leg who lives with an abusive aunt. The two of them hit it off and soon are sharing all their time together. But tragedy lays in store for the couple. First Donny's mother wants to sell him as a slave to another man, the local reverend puts the moves on Jenny, Miss Martins decides to evict Donny when she learns of Jenny and then the gang members attack Jenny as well. All of this combines to unleash the fury that resides inside of Donny. Given a mega-budget and featuring more well-known actors this sounds like a major release. But in the hands of Milligan it isn't quite that good. That being said from my exposure to his films this one is actually pretty good. Even the acting, while not Oscar worthy, is pretty good. In particular Jessica Straus as Jenny does a great job. Fortunately she's gone on to a huge career in voice over performing. The movie still has that home-made feel to it. It also has that loving attempt be Milligan to make an actual movie while still confined to the exploitation genre. There is plenty of gore effects on display here like a severed head featured in the artwork for the movie but most of it, while effective, is pretty tame and simple. As I stated in my review for MONSTROSITY Milligan falls into that category of film makers most define by how bad their films were. But the invention of first VHS and now disc has changed viewers so that fans of the offbeat, the strange and the different are now able to view movies like these and enjoy them for what they are, movie made by people who love movies but who lack the technical expertise and budgets to make them perfect. Yeah it's not Oscar material but it can still be fun. I also mentioned the fact that Garagehouse Pictures is the little engine that could and I still hold that they deserve that title. Not rushing titles out, not overloading a market with substandard versions like we saw happen when VHS made its debut, they are taking the time to restore and present movies like this in the best mode and shape possible. They've done that with this film, one that a vast majority of people aren't seeking but tried and true movie fans are clamoring for. It's offering the film for the first time in HD with a restoration created from the original camera negative. One of the extras included even shows the difference their restoration has made on the film presented here. Other extras include an audio commentary track with producers Paul Maslak and Neva Friedenn, make-up man Rodd Matsui & actor Patrick Thomas, an audio commentary with film historian Keith Crocker moderated by George Reis, "Matsui s Monstrosities: An Interview with a Make-Up Man: Part 2", trailers of other Andy Milligan films, trailers of other Garagehouse Pictures films, cover art by Stephen Romano and a limited edition slip sleeve art by Justin Miller. Once again they are limiting this to just 1,000 prints so if you're interested make sure you order your copy today.

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